Titus Crow by Brian Lumley @ BrianLumley | kurtsprings1 #review #cosmichorror

Author: Brian Lumley

Book: Titus Crow: The Burrowers Beneath, the Transition of Titus Crow

Published: January 1999

Publisher: Tor Books

Genre: Cosmic Horror

Source: eBook

Rating:Print

Synopsis:

The Burrowers Beneath

Humanity has moved about the Earth for thousands of years, little knowing what horrors lie buried or imprisoned beneath the Earth’s crust or under the Earth’s oceans. Once again, the Great Old Ones and their inhuman minions are on the move. And still “In his house at R’lyeh, dead Cthulhu lies dreaming.”

Yet some humans have prepared for this. Among them are Titus Crow and his friend, Henri de Marigny. As Cthulhian horrors move to free their kind from the prisons of the Elder Gods, Titus, Henri, and their friends from Miskatonic University are on the move. They are destroying imprisoned Cthulhians and trying to trap the others. Battle lines are drawn, and the Great Old Ones have realized their peril. Titus and Henri must fight for their lives and every living thing they hold dear.

The Transition of Titus Crow

The Great Old One, Ithiqua (The Wind-Walker), has sent elementals to attack Titus Crow and Henri de Marigny. An ancient artifact of Titus’s is there only escape. It is a curious clock that can travel in other dimensions. Henri returns home ten years later, then locates and rescues Titus with the help of a friend of Titus’s who is a medium. What follows is Titus’s account of his adventures in space and time. “Stranger things under Heaven and Earth” doesn’t begin to cover it.

Review:

It is no secret that I’ve been fascinated by Howard Phillips Lovecraft’s Cthulhu mythology. Brian Lumley has set a series of adventures in the worlds Lovecraft’s cosmic horror. Only in Lumley’s world, humanity isn’t quite helpless. Titus Crow is part of a cadre of people who have dedicated their lives to stopping the Great Old Ones, long imprisoned by the Elder Gods. The Burrowers Beneath follows Titus and Henri de Marigny’s efforts to stop a group of Cthulhian horrors known as the Burrowers. The Transition of Titus Crow is an account of Titus’s adventures as he meets the Elder Gods themselves.

This one was hard to rate. The one thing Brian Lumley, unfortunately, emulated from Lovecraft’s writing style is his love for long exposition. (And there is a lot of it.) At the same time, it changes the flavor of the cosmic horror in an unfeeling universe. Humanity, while the underdog, isn’t helpless, and out in the universe, there are forces as powerful as the Great Old Ones who are sympathetic. So how do I rate it? Well, I’m eager to read Clock of Dreams (Titus Crow #3), in spite of the exposition.

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